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Published by Croom Helm in association with the Open University Press in London .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Great Britain.

Subjects:

  • Popular culture -- Great Britain.,
  • Popular culture.,
  • Recreation -- Great Britain.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementedited by Bernard Waites, Tony Bennett, and Graham Martin.
SeriesOpen University set book
ContributionsWaites, Bernard., Bennett, Tony, 1947-, Martin, Graham, 1927-
Classifications
LC ClassificationsDA110 .P66 1982
The Physical Object
Pagination326 p. ;
Number of Pages326
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL2349833M
ISBN 100709919093
LC Control Number86673479

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ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: Consists chiefly of essays previously published, Description: pages ; 22 cm. The vast majority of the superheroes that are popular today were created in the s through the s, so to understand the factors that have influenced their popularity in the past and continue to do so, we must comprehend the context of their creation and rise to success. The result is a surprisingly candid series of conversations and reflections on how the past infuses the present with meaning. Journal of Popular Culture A fascinating study., Library Journal. About the Author. Roy Rosenzweig is professor of history and Director of the Center for History and New Media at George Mason by: This book surveys popular culture in Britain from the early nineteenth-century to the present.

The Garland Science website is no longer available to access and you have been automatically redirected to INSTRUCTORS. All instructor resources (*see Exceptions) are now available on our Instructor instructor credentials will not grant access to the Hub, but existing and new users may request access student . Understanding Music: Past and Present is an open Music Appreciation textbook co-authored by music faculty across Georgia. The text covers the fundamentals of music and the physics of sound, an exploration of music from the Middle Ages to the present day, and a final chapter on popular music in the United States/5(11). Books shelved as past-and-present-theme: On a Falling Tide by Georgia Hill, The Girl in the Picture by Kerry Barrett, Echoes of the Runes: A sweeping, ep.   Cool Japan: A Guide to Tokyo, Kyoto, Tohoku and Japanese Culture Past and Present (Cool Japan Series) Inspire a love of reading with Prime Book Box for Kids. Discover delightful children's books with Prime Book Box, a subscription that delivers new books every 1, 2, or 3 months — new customers receive 15% off your first box. Learn more/5(38).

Popular Culture: A Reader helps students understand the pervasive role of popular culture and the processes that constitute it as a product of industry, an intellectual object of inquiry, and an integral component of all our volume is divided into 7 thematic sections, and each section is preceded by an introduction which engages with, and critiques, the chapters that s: 1. The novel The Catcher in the Rye by J. D. Salinger has had a lasting influence as it remains both a bestseller and a frequently challenged book. Numerous works in popular culture have referenced the novel. Factors contributing to the novel's mystique and impact include its portrayal of protagonist Holden Caulfield; its tone of sincerity; its themes of familial neglect, tension . The butterfly effect is the phenomenon in chaos theory whereby a minor change in circumstances can cause a large change in outcome. The butterfly metaphor was created by Edward Norton Lorenz to emphasize the inherent unpredictable results of small changes in the initial conditions of certain physical systems. The concept was taken up by popular culture, and interpreted to . Popular Culture Becomes Global Popular culture didn’t require satellite television and the Internet to become global. When the first explorers took to the seas or traveled overland routes to distant places, they were influenced by, and returned with, examples of other cultures’ popular art, artifacts and customs, such as drinking coffee.